Posted in 2017, Aging, postaday, Quilts, Rambling thoughts, Senior Salon, Sewing, Yes

I See Quilts.

Not as bad as “I See Dead People.”  This just means that I look at a beautiful landscape and try to figure out how to turn it into a quilt.  I did not realize that everyone didn’t do this.  I know many of my quilt friends get it because they do the same thing.

college exam quilt

An honors course I took in college called “Women In Literature” gave us a lot of latitude to create our own final for the course.  Some wrote an essay about what they felt about the course; some made a video of one of the books we read; I made a quilt. The reading material translated in my mind to quilt blocks.

housewarming quilt

Many of us make quilts for all life experiences.  The birth of a child is an obvious one, however birthday and house-warming are a couple of automatic occasions in my mind.  Another occasion is the passing of a friend or family member, also a promotion at work fits the category.  We can’t forget as a fundraiser either.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I don’t believe this is a deadly illness to have, some may disagree when they see the size of my fabric stash.  If it falls down, it’s all over.  I would cite a lot of other examples, but my mind is already racing at my next blog post and what quilt will I use to explain it.  How would you gift a quilt or what event would you like to receive a quilt for?

 

 

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8 thoughts on “I See Quilts.

  1. Your quilts are gorgeous! My great grandmother made quilts and everyone in my family had one. They keep you so warm and they are so pretty! Keep up the fabulous quilts.

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  2. Absolutely stunning, Kathy – did you make them all? Especially the first one, which I adore. It brings to mind city lights during rooftop dinners in my NYC years. Your “fabric stash” comment brought a big grin to my face. My mother didn’t quilt, but she designed and made most of the clothing that my sister and I wore. Her sewing room stash took us almost two entire days to go through after her death – not counting the time it took to document and donate.

    I have developed an admiration for art quilts of the type that paints a picture since I was fortunate enough to wander into early quilt exhibit at the midtown Folk Museum in NYC during a lunch break. I must admit I never gave quilts a passing thought until that time, much less appreciated a grossly UNDER-appreciated art form. Thank you SO much for sharing on this week’s Senior Salon.

    I’m not that far from Paducah KY, home of the American Quilt Museum, recognized by USA Today as one of the world’s top quilt displays. I hope to visit the next time my schedule will allow a short break and at least one overnight stay.

    btw – I’m not sure what happened, but I had to use Google to find this week’s post – the link you left at Bernadette’s returns a blogroll of my own articles when I click it.
    xx,
    mgh
    (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
    ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
    “It takes a village to educate a world!”

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    1. Hello,
      Thank you so much for the kind words. I started sewing at a very young age and loved it, I landed in the quilt zone about 40 years ago and have stayed there. Thanks for the heads up about the link, I will check it.
      Kathy

      Liked by 2 people

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